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Justice Nnanna (United States) Exhibition

On the 26th-27th October 2019, Justice Nnanna had an exhibition.

 

Whoever Collects the Most Faces, Wins the Game

The more faces you collect, the more power you have. How quick is your eye? 

Facial recognition is a way of recognizing a Human face through technology. A facial recognition system uses biometrics to map facial features from a photograph or video. It compares the information with a database of known faces to find a match— in under 2 seconds.

Whoever Collects the Most Faces Wins the Game is an instillation, in development,  to discuss computers seeing Human faces through the use of facial-recognition software. With ethnic, gendered,  and aesthetic prejudices built into this computer “eye”, Whoever Collects the Most Faces Wins the Game challenges the Human viewer to see-quickly and identify Human faces from images taken across Earth. 

Today, facial-recognition software is used for numerous real-world applications: Human tracking, public surveillance, law-enforcement,  targeted-ads, to unlock iPhones, find missing persons, diagnose diseases that cause changes in appearance, find lost pets, etc. In the future, facial recognition software will be even more readily available and its applications unlimited. 

What do you see when you look? How fast can you see?

Through the artist’s image archive, the viewer is  challenged to recognize human faces as efficiently as AI. Ready. See. Go! 

 
 
 
 

 

“Taking Space

In this ongoing series, the artist explores careful-seeing through photo imagery. 

In this series of triptychs, from New York, USA , Lagos,Nigeria, and Putumayo, Colombia— we see a single image divided into three. 

The original image hangs lowest, with zoomed in crops from the same image above it.  The subject taking up most space becomes the object of our view- if we look only at the newly tight cropped image, then we see a different narrative. One of equal “value”, but not seen as actually in the large original image where its’ narrative is dwarfed. 

 

Thank you Justice!
We hope we can see you again in the near future!